Horticultural Therapist

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Horticultural therapy combines gardening and social services to improve the lives of people with physical and mental health problems. A horticultural therapist engages a patient in gardening and plant-based activities to achieve specific therapeutic treatment goals.

Horticultural therapists can be found working in a wide variety of settings, such as rehabilitation centers, hospitals, schools, community gardens, retirement centers, and correctional facilities. They often collaborate with health care practitioners and mental health experts to help patients reach therapeutic and vocational goals.

TRAINING/EDUCATION NEEDED

Academic coursework is the foundation in horticultural therapy. Horticultural therapy education is multidisciplinary and encompasses studies in human sciences and plant science, as well as horticultural therapy concepts and techniques.

Plant science and human science courses may be taken at a college or university or as an online course. Horticultural therapy coursework is available through an academic degree program or through an AHTA-Accredited Certificate Program.

WHERE TO STUDY

For a list of 2- and 4-year college and university horticulture programs across the country, visit our Where to Study page.

For specialization in horticultural therapy, see the list of certificate programs and the list of university programs that offer coursework and degree programs that focus on horticultural therapy.

SALARY EXPECTATIONS

In December 2018, the median annual salary for horticultural therapists ranged from $51,878 - $96,921, according to PayScale.com.

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS

VIDEOS AND TESTIMONIALS

Learn more about horticultural therapy and therapeutic horticulture: